Kyle R. Brady: Profile | Blog | Reads

Friday, July 31, 2015

Recommended Reading: July 2015, Part II

Note: this is part of a series, "Recommended Reading," published monthly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them. These are drawn through my own readings related to the field, as well as the more interesting/applicable readings from my coursework at PSU. I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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Sunday, July 26, 2015

Publishing Note: "Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA): Domestic Military Deployments, Homeland Security, and Public Support"

A new graduate paper is now available ("Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA): Domestic Military Deployments, Homeland Security, and Public Support") on Academia.edu.  It reviews the ways in which DSCA can call the military into action for homeland security events, why this is important within the homeland security apparatus, and the public's perception of domestic missions for the military.
At the very founding of the United States, core principles were established to prevent a recurrence of a greatly despised and feared activity: the use of the military against the American people. The U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights -- particularly the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Ninth Amendments -- were the direct product of the experience of the American Colonies under British rule from afar through the often injudicious use of military forces, wherein the public were subjected to various injustices for fear of retribution and consequence. Two-hundred and thirty-nine years after the Colonies declared independence from the British Empire, the American people remain extraordinarily wary of the domestic use of the military -- despite a dearth of incidents -- even for roles specifically ascribed in the Defense Support of Civil Authorities. As the role of the Armed Forces expands in its domestic uses, particularly in the service of homeland security, it is important to understand the ways in which the vast resources of the Department of Defense may and may not be used. Moreover, public opinion of and support for domestic military deployments -- regardless of legality, scope, or importance -- is an important consideration in the modern political environment.

Brady, K. (2015). Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA): Domestic Military Deployments, Homeland Security, and Public Support. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/14408895/Defense_Support_of_Civil_Authorities_DSCA_Domestic_Military_Deployments_Homeland_Security_and_Public_Support

In Brief: On Iran and Past Predictions

This short post is only to note that one of my graduate papers ("Iranian Democratization Potential: Comparing Ahmadinejad and Rouhani") from Fall 2013 -- my very first -- compared Iranian Presidents and examined any differences that may produce positive results in the state, particularly with its positioning and relations with the West.  Ultimately, I concluded that President Rouhani had great potential to change the way in which the international community approached Iran and that the state might reform itself.  In September 2013, this was not a common sense claim.

However, now that Secretary Kerry's negotiations have produced a deal that would control Iranian interests in nuclear weapons, while having the Iranian people rejoin the international community and markets, this paper can be marked as having correctly predicted -- nearly two years in advance -- the marked change of a new President of Iran and an Iranian public more interested in the future than the past.  Whether democracy or any democratic reforms will come remains to be seen, but the potential for further change remains.
Brady, K. (2013). Iranian Democratization Potential: Comparing Ahmadinejad and Rouhani. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/4545677/Iranian_Democratization_Potential_Comparing_Ahmadinejad_and_Rouhani

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Recommended Reading: July 2015, Part I

Note: this is part of a series, "Recommended Reading," published monthly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them. These are drawn through my own readings related to the field, as well as the more interesting/applicable readings from my coursework at PSU. I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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Sunday, July 5, 2015

Publishing Note: "Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources: Securing the American Internet in the Digital Era"

A new graduate paper, "Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources: Securing the American Internet in the Digital Era," is now available on Academia.edu.  This paper addresses the Internet as a critical infrastructure element and key resource (CIKR) in the United States, its fundamental vulnerabilities, and how these vulnerabilities might be resolved.

Abstract:
Since its birth decades ago as an inter-university communications utility, the Internet has evolved beyond a mere academic triviality into an element of critical infrastructure and a key resource (CIKR) for much of the developed world. The United States, as one of the largest and most technologically-driven societies in the international community, has fully embraced the Internet as not just a platform for instantaneous communications, but also for highly developed and oft-utilized methods of commerce, data storage, and key aspects of a variety of industries and markets. This, then, presents a difficult problem in need of immediate attention: the Internet, even the portions within American borders, is largely unregulated, undefended, and open to both intrusion and attack. Much like the transportation systems or electrical grid of the United States, were the Internet to be a vector for attack or, far worse, fully fail, the American government, its people, and its economy would be severely and negatively affected. As CIKR, the American Internet must, instead, be better secured.

Brady, K. (2015). Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources: Securing the American Internet in the Digital Era. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/13521842/Critical_Infrastructure_and_Key_Resources_Securing_the_American_Internet_in_the_Digital_Era