Kyle R. Brady: Profile | Blog | Reads

Friday, October 30, 2015

Publishing Note: "Public Transportation, Cyberattacks, and Washington, D.C.: Using Critical Infrastructure as a Weapons Platform"

A new fictional scenario narrative and brief analysis from myself, Tim Crawford, Jesse Macera, and Danielle "Harley" Miller ("Public Transportation, Cyberattacks, and Washington, D.C.: Using Critical Infrastructure as a Weapons Platform") is now available on Academia.edu:
The latest and most detrimental form of a cyber attack is the Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). An APT is a series of varying aggressive and continuous attacks by an actor toward a specific target that employs many tools from the hacker’s arsenal. Similar to terrorism, a successful APT requires an end goal, organization, and monetary support. This developing threat is unique because it quickly adapts to defenses that attempt to thwart it and requires substantial organization, funding, and patience in order to properly execute.

Access to continuous sources of information is imperative to both the adversaries and their targets. For example, anyone can now explore -- simply via the Internet -- how to unlawfully access Industrial Control Systems (ICS) that supply, regulate, and coordinate essential functions of critical infrastructure elements. Foresight suggests that these multi-faceted control systems can be easily accessed and altered to increase chemical levels in water, cut off electrical and gas supplies, or to exploit information and disseminate propaganda. In fact, public transportation systems in highly populated areas, such as Washington, D.C., would be an ideal target for a group with these capabilities and a destructive agenda.

Brady, K. R. (2015). Public Transportation, Cyberattacks, and Washington, D.C.: Using Critical Infrastructure as a Weapons Platform. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/17534851/

Monday, October 26, 2015

Recommended Reading: October 2015, Part II

Note: this is part of a series, "Recommended Reading," published monthly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them. These are drawn through my own readings related to the field.  I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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Monday, October 19, 2015

Publishing Note: "Terrorism and the Permanent War: Ownership, American Participation, and Future Courses of Action"

A peer-reviewed paper ("Terrorism and the Permanent War: Ownership, American Participation, and Future Courses of Action") is now on Academia.edu, while it awaits publication.  Posted with permission of the journal, due to publishing delays.

Despite its recent resurgence in international cultural memory, terrorism is not a new phenomenon: the nearly fourteen years since the attacks of September 11, 2001 on domestic, civilian American targets constitute only the most recent chapter of a history that spans centuries, if not millennia. If the definition of terrorism is expanded to include both its tactical predecessor -- guerilla warfare -- and its strategic predecessor -- asymmetrical warfare -- then terrorism, indeed, has quite the storied history. Perhaps more importantly, it is an ever-evolving tactic used in an array of contexts, which now appears to quixotically include traditional forms of warfare. Consequently, the United States -- as the most heavily-invested party to counter-/anti-terror efforts -- must decide how to successfully address the issue, as it becomes increasingly clear that terrorism cannot be forced to simply disappear. The question facing the United States, then, is one of ownership, participation, and future courses of action.

Brady, K. (2015). Terrorism and the Permanent War: Ownership, American Participation, and Future Courses of Action. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/12318966/

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Publishing Note: "Assessing Operation Jump Start: Intricacies and Nuances of Domestic Deployments"

A short paper ("Assessing Operation Jump Start: Intricacies and Nuances of Domestic Deployments") is now available on Academia.edu:

In June of 2006, Operation Jump Start was announced by President George W. Bush as an effort to support the efforts of the U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) with National Guard troops. Citing an influx of illegal immigration across the U.S.-Mexico border, President Bush saw fit to employ the Guard as a way to help stem the tide of immigrants while the Border Patrol increased its Agent ranks. In this way, Operation Jump Start provides a modern example of the use of the military in a domestic role outside of natural disaster response.

Brady, K. (2015). Assessing Operation Jump Start: Intricacies and Nuances of Domestic Deployments. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/16971633/

Friday, October 9, 2015

Recommended Reading: October 2015, Part I

Note: this is part of a series, "Recommended Reading," published monthly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them. These are drawn through my own readings related to the field, as well as the more interesting/applicable readings from my coursework at PSU. I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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