Kyle R. Brady: Profile | Blog | Reads

Monday, November 30, 2015

Publishing Note: "A City Under Attack: A Fictional Scenario and Report to Analyze, Respond To, Mitigate, and Prevent a Multi-stage Terror Attack"

An extensive fictional case study analysis and report ("A City Under Attack: A Fictional Scenario and Report to Analyze, Respond To, Mitigate, and Prevent a Multi-stage Terror Attack") is now available on Academia.edu:
There are few events more terrifying than a terror attack, particularly a well-planned and coordinated one. Based upon a fictional scenario developed and set in downtown Los Angeles, California, the aftermath of, effects from, and response to a multi-modal, multi-stage, cascading terror attack can be assessed, in order to better prevent and mitigate such an attack. By exploring the details of the emergency, first responder, and law enforcement response, as well as that of the public, strengths and weaknesses are more easily identified. Furthermore, concrete action-items are identified in order to exploit these strengths and fortify the weaknesses, including in the areas of education, training, communications, technology, policy, the intelligence and law enforcement communities, risk assessment and management, and future scenario development. The conclusion is, ultimately, one both favorable and sobering: although domestic terror attacks within the United States are extraordinarily difficult to prevent, an abundant and sufficient amount of training, preparation, and pre-planned coordination can help to ensure that the best possible response is enacted, with the best possible outcomes.

Brady, K. R. (2015). A City Under Attack: A Fictional Scenario and Report to Analyze, Respond To, Mitigate, and Prevent a Multi-stage Terror Attack. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/18963539/

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Recommended Reading: November 2015, Part II

Note: this is part of a regular series, "Recommended Reading," published biweekly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them.  These are drawn through my own readings related to the fields of homeland security, national security, homeland defense, law enforcement, foreign policy/international relations, security studies, and intelligence.  I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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Sunday, November 15, 2015

Publishing Note: "The United States, Terrorism, and the Evolving ISIS Threat"

A new bottom-line-up-front (BLUF) briefing paper ("The United States, Terrorism, and the Evolving ISIS Threat") is now available on Academia.edu:
The United States remains a target of great interest for ISIS, particularly as they expand their scope of operations, augment their tactics, and modify their overall strategy. Indications continue to strongly suggest that ISIS is seeking to execute acts of terror in the West, including the United States, through the use of carefully crafted, sequentially planned, and fully prepared attacks on the general public. Such attacks are expected to continue to fail to discriminate between the general public and members of the government or the military. American citizens should remain aware and vigilant at all times, regardless of their perceptions of safety and security, and maintain an awareness of secondary exits, additional methods of egress, and other key components of increasing survivability in any hostile situation.

Brady, K. R. (2015). The United States, Terrorism, and the Evolving ISIS Threat. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/18400364/

Saturday, November 7, 2015

Publishing Note: "Securing Critical Digital Infrastructure: The Future Cloud, Pervasive and Secure"

A new, non-affiliated research paper ("Securing Critical Digital Infrastructure: The Future Cloud, Pervasive and Secure") is now available on Academia.edu:
With the seemingly unending disclosure of unprecedented, massive breaches of digital information -- ranging from millions of active credit cards to federal employee rosters and background investigation details -- the need to secure American critical digital infrastructure (CI-D) is more important now than ever. Across both public and private sectors, much of of the world’s information is now contained within the confines of servers and databases, due to to ease-of-use, cost-benefit ratios, and data longevity. However, such systems -- often directly connected to the Internet -- present themselves as targets of varying interest to state, sub-state, non-state, international, and private hackers interested in generating massive profits, gaining immense strategic advantages in the realms of politics and war, or both. The present disparity of security for these systems, in all sectors, therefore presents a substantial threat to national security, simply through their very existence -- they need not be attacked to be considered a vulnerability to the American government, its people, and its very existence. A grand, simple, and universal solution exists to resolve many CI-D concerns: the pervasive and secure use of cloud computing.

Brady, K. R. (2015). Securing Critical Digital Infrastructure: The Future Cloud, Pervasive and Secure. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/14931432/

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Recommended Reading: November 2015, Part I

Note: this is part of a regular series, "Recommended Reading," published biweekly as a collection of longform, academic, or journalistic works well worth the time to read them.  These are drawn through my own readings related to the fields of homeland security, national security, homeland defense, law enforcement, foreign policy/international relations, security studies, and intelligence.  I receive no benefit -- financial or otherwise -- through the recommendations and/or links provided.  The format used is simple title-link, due to the volume and effort required to properly format them in more scholarly forms.  Links are not endorsements; they also don't always open in new windows:  be sure to click carefully.  (Full disclaimer.)

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